I work as an engineer; it allows me to buy running gear and cupcakes. Single, Marathoner, Washington D.C.
Install Theme
Yasso 800s: A Simple Method For Predicting Marathon Finish Times
Here is Amby Burfoot’s article with a video description by Bart Yasso himself!
My running coach likes to drop this workout throughout my training program to track my progress.  Do not let the simplicity of this workout fool you into a false sense of security. 
Training Tips (via Christine Luff)
Check your shoulders: are your shoulders moving up toward your ears? If so, roll your head, push your shoulder blades together, and let your shoulders drop.
Keep arms at a 90-degree angle:  are your arms at a 90-degree angle? When runners get tired or tense, their hands start to move up towards their shoulders. If you notice this happening, drop your arms and shake out your arms. Then re-position them at a 90-degree angle.
Relax your hands and wrist:  are your hands in a tight fist? If you’re clenching your fists, the tension in your hands will move from there up your arms to your shoulders and neck. Try to keep your hands and wrists relaxed. You should keep your hand in a loose fist, almost as if you’re holding an egg and you don’t want to break it.
Keep your arms at your side:  are your arms crossing over your chest? Your arms should swing at your side and not cross your chest. If you’re crossing over your chest, your arms will start moving up toward your shoulders and you’ll find yourself hunching over more (which also makes it harder to breathe). Keep your arms at your sides, parallel to each other.
This is a simple yet brutal workout.  If you are willing to endure the torture, you will benefit physiologically and psychologically.  
Stick with it and you will be pleasantly surprised with how well you perform on race day!
Happy running and best efforts,
—vegancupcakecommander
p.s. Do not worry about the recovery 400M pace; your effort is better spent on consistent/negative splits during your 800M repeats. (Running 101 posts)
Source: Burfoot, Amby. “Yasso 800s” Runner’s World & Running Times. 28 September 2001. Web. 19 February 2014.
Source: Luff, Christine. “How to Avoid Tension While Running” About.com Running/Jogging. 21 January 2014. Web. 19 February 2014.
Yasso 800s: A Simple Method For Predicting Marathon Finish Times

Here is Amby Burfoot’s article with a video description by Bart Yasso himself!

My running coach likes to drop this workout throughout my training program to track my progress.  Do not let the simplicity of this workout fool you into a false sense of security. 

Training Tips (via Christine Luff)

  • Check your shoulders: are your shoulders moving up toward your ears? If so, roll your head, push your shoulder blades together, and let your shoulders drop.
  • Keep arms at a 90-degree angle:  are your arms at a 90-degree angle? When runners get tired or tense, their hands start to move up towards their shoulders. If you notice this happening, drop your arms and shake out your arms. Then re-position them at a 90-degree angle.
  • Relax your hands and wrist:  are your hands in a tight fist? If you’re clenching your fists, the tension in your hands will move from there up your arms to your shoulders and neck. Try to keep your hands and wrists relaxed. You should keep your hand in a loose fist, almost as if you’re holding an egg and you don’t want to break it.
  • Keep your arms at your side:  are your arms crossing over your chest? Your arms should swing at your side and not cross your chest. If you’re crossing over your chest, your arms will start moving up toward your shoulders and you’ll find yourself hunching over more (which also makes it harder to breathe). Keep your arms at your sides, parallel to each other.

This is a simple yet brutal workout.  If you are willing to endure the torture, you will benefit physiologically and psychologically.  

Stick with it and you will be pleasantly surprised with how well you perform on race day!

Happy running and best efforts,

—vegancupcakecommander

p.s. Do not worry about the recovery 400M pace; your effort is better spent on consistent/negative splits during your 800M repeats. (Running 101 posts)

Source: Burfoot, Amby. “Yasso 800s” Runner’s World & Running Times. 28 September 2001. Web. 19 February 2014.

Source: Luff, Christine. “How to Avoid Tension While Running” About.com Running/Jogging. 21 January 2014. Web. 19 February 2014.

  1. healthylife21 reblogged this from vegancupcakecommander
  2. danteswonderland reblogged this from vegancupcakecommander
  3. runningwiththewinchesters reblogged this from vegancupcakecommander
  4. fortheloveof-run reblogged this from runninggirlsrock
  5. spicyrunnergirl reblogged this from vegancupcakecommander and added:
    Love doing this workout!
  6. runninggirlsrock reblogged this from vegancupcakecommander
  7. kris3too0 reblogged this from vegancupcakecommander
  8. fuckyeahhfitspiration reblogged this from vegancupcakecommander
  9. ms-aimee reblogged this from vegancupcakecommander
  10. vegancupcakecommander posted this